Final Week’s Instructions for Spring 2020 Term

Hello all,

I was pleased to see so many of you turned in your completed coursework on Monday, and I look forward to reading it closely and grading very soon. Your diligence, hard work, and persistence in less-than-ideal learning circumstances are impressive. I hope you each feel proud of your accomplishments and your learning in this course, even though it wasn’t what we all envisioned at the outset together.

Next Monday, May 11, please plan to join your colleagues via Zoom from 5-7 pm at the link posted on Blackboard announcements.

During that meeting we will hold a mini-academic conference, in which each of you will have an opportunity to speak about your project. Plan on 5-7 minutes each. I would advise writing out your comments and practicing them ahead of time, using a timer, to make sure you fit within your allotted time. You may use Powerpoint to share images, if you want, through Zoom screen sharing. We will hopefully be joined by other faculty from the department and/or from the Honors program as audience.

I’ll briefly introduce the presentations in groups of 3 or 4, as would be customary at an academic conference, similar to conference panels.

The panels will be titled as follows:

Corruption and Salvation in Gilded Age New York City

The Constitution, Politics, and the Law

Rural Discontents: Farmers, Miners, and Struggles over Indigenous Lands

See Blackboard for the details on which panel your presentation is in. If you have questions or concerns, or want me to look at a draft of your comments in advance, please reach out and we can set up a call or Zoom this coming week. Also, if you need extended time for completion of any remaining coursework, also reach out so we can set up a completion plan.

See you Monday the 11th,

Dr. Hangen

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For Mon 2/24

Undergrads: (5 points)

Choose *one* primary source you’ve encountered in your recent research. It does not have to be something you are planning to use in your eventual paper. Analyze it using one or more of the tools posted on the Source Analysis resource page.

Write about your source in a 500-1000 word paper. Begin with a description of it and what is known of its provenance (see the resource page for a definition of this term). Include an image, if appropriate. Offer a close reading of it, using questions from the analysis tools that seem appropriate to you. Then reflect on this item: what does it tell us about some aspect of the Gilded Age? Cite the item and any resources you referenced in your analysis, using correct Chicago Style citation.

If you need assistance with Chicago Style consult the second half of your Turabian book, or use the Chicago Citation Guide in WSU’s History and Political Science LibGuide.

Be prepared to speak from your paper in class; each person will have a chance to present their source and their findings to the group.

Grad Students: (10 points)

Choose one primary source you’ve encountered in your recent research. It does not have to be something you are planning to use in your eventual paper. Pair it with a second source, which could be another primary source, or could be a secondary source (journal article, book, etc) relevant to your research. Analyze your sources using one or more of the tools posted on the Source Analysis resource page.

Write about your sources in a 800-1500 word paper. Your paper should include a description of both sources and what is known of their provenance (see the resource page for a definition of this term). Include images, if appropriate. Offer a close reading of both, using questions from the analysis tools that seem appropriate to you. Compare / contrast the two along any dimensions you find meaningful. How would you situate these items within your current knowledge of the history and historiography of the Gilded Age? Cite both items and any resources you referenced in your analysis, using correct Chicago Style citation.

If you need assistance with Chicago Style consult the second half of your Turabian book, or use the Chicago Citation Guide in WSU’s History and Political Science LibGuide.

Be prepared to speak from your paper in class; each person will have a chance to present their sources and findings to the group.

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No Class Feb 17

No class tonight (Mon Feb 17), so please use this as an opportunity to post on the state of your research so far. Remind us of your topic, and tell us: What have you found? What primary or secondary sources have you located that you think you will incorporate? What’s been triumphant, frustrating, or baffling? Where could you use input or advice from your colleagues?

Please add your post and/or peer feedback before Sunday night, February 23 at 11:59 pm, when the forum closes.

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Important! First IN-PERSON Class will be Jan 27

The syllabus has now been posted on Blackboard and to the course website (see Syllabus tab, above).

Please note, this is a blended course and meets partly online. The first two weeks will be conducted ONLINE. There will be no class meetings on Jan 13 or Jan 20. The first in-person class will be Jan 27.

However: there is a lot that YOU need to do in the first two weeks of class. Please navigate to the Content section on Blackboard –> Weeks 1 and 2 document has details and a checklist, or download it here.

Weeks 1&2 for HI 460 Students
Weeks 1&2 for HI 914 Students

If you have general questions about the class, please ask them in the Troubleshooting discussion forum on Blackboard and I’ll answer them there. If you have specific questions that apply only to you, please email me at thangen@worcester.edu. I will be on campus starting Tuesday, Jan 22 and I hold regular office hours Mon 1:30 – 3:30, Thurs 1-2, and by appointment.

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Welcome, Spring 2020

This course on the United States from 1865 – 1900 (and a little bit beyond) combines the History major undergraduate capstone course (HI 460) with a grad-level research seminar (HI 914). Please check the appropriate tab (above) for information on your course readings and expectations.

Our class meets on Monday evenings from 5-8 pm, but as a blended course, it is conducted partially online. As of now, we plan to meet face-to-face twelve times, on the following dates:

January 27
February 3, 10, and 24
March 2, 9, and 23
April 6, 13, and 27
May 4 and 11

Possible snow days may require further adjustment, stay tuned!

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